The high environmental cost of indoor cannabis

Reports show that the cannabis industry consumes energy like no other industry in the United States.
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Reports show that the cannabis industry consumes energy like no other industry in the United States.

Since legalization in Oregon and Colorado, different organizations have studied the impact of cannabis indoors massively under artificial light. Often this type of crop need heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, fans, and indoor lighting equipment 24 hours a day and various growing sites.

Cannabis farming houses are high when compared to other types of businesses or residential houses.

Electricity accounts for about 20% of the industry’s cost of production

Several reports have pointed to these increases. In 2014, the NPCC (UK State Agency) noted in a report that to produce one kilogram of cannabis, between 4,000 to 6,000 hours of kilowatts (kWh) were needed.

Another 2015 report noted that at least 2% of Boulder County’s electricity use was hoarded by the cannabis industry. More recently, in 2017,

New Frontier Data published a report that concludes that the cannabis industry in its various forms could be accounting for between 4-5% of U.S. electricity production.

Measurements show that so much electricity can be compared to what would produce three million cars average in a year and its ecological footprint of 15 million greenhouse gas (CO2) emissions.

At MCN we were tasked with finding ways to reverse this effect. Here are some solutions to this crisis:

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